TERRITORIALITY



 
Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 14:19:54 +1000
From: sg.smith@qut.edu.au (Sandy Smith)
To: envbeh-l@duke.poly.edu
Subject: test instruments for territoriality
 

Dear All,
Is anybody aware of any instruments developed to measure different types of territory or territoriality?
Please let me know of any as we would rather use/adapt existing measures than reinvent the wheel.
Thanks,
sandy

Dr Sandy Smith,
School of Social Science,
Queensland University of Technology,
PO Box 2434 Brisbane 4001
Australia
Phone: (07) 3864 4502
 

________________________
Date: Mon Mar 02 23:00:23 1998
To: envbeh-l@duke.poly.edu
From: negenter@worldcom.ch (Nold Egenter)
Subject: Re: Test instruments for territoriality
 
 

Sandy Smith and other interested in territoriality,

Exemplarically interesting! All these discussions about human territoriality and behavior in space are handicapped by two things:
1) the projection of space as void on human condition (disparity of anthropological space and space of physics, astronomy etc.)
2) that the humanities and their classification into post-scholastic disciplines have outtrickstered the territorial categories of human material culture (architecture, art, etc.) as well as of human ideas (religion, philosophy, science etc.). What remains is a highly distilled view that covers up the fact that man is still tremendously a "territorial animal" (Robert Ardrey)
* Read ancient myths of creation, Babylonian for instance: its basically on territorial demarcation.
* Read about ancient Religions: they are basically territorially constitutive (including the Ancient Testament!)
* Have a look at maps of the Middle Ages: Cathedrals, churches and monasteries are represented as 'pars pro toto' for certain territories, in fact, as 'nuclear territorial demarcation'.

Thus, to "measure" territoriality in airport lounges is probably not the right place to solve the problem!

To get out of this handicap, you should probably include literature on territoriality in the animal world. Because research is much more objective there. You will become aware about the complex importance of the 'territorial imperative' (Ardrey), also for man.
* Hediger, H. did several studies on territoriality of animals (e.g. ; Evolution of territorial behavior, in: Washburn S. L. (ed.), The social Life of Early Man 1961; Nest and home, Folia primatologica 28, 170-87)
* Ardrey, R.: The Territorial Imperative (1966). In spite of some illegitimate 'biologisms' still the best on the topic.
* Bollnow, O. W.: Man and space (1963; see English review in our website)

Best wishes

Nold Egenter

Probably the best sources for 'human territoriality' and its spatial and structural extensions are the recent cultural history books amply using maps and culturo-historical atlasses!

_________________________

>Sandy Smith and others interested in territoriality,
>By territoriality you could mean the size of the "bubble" Edward T Hall is
>refering to when he talks about the "hidden dimension". I don't know what
>you mean exactly by "instruments", but a possible method is the one used >by Sven Dahlman in his study (1973) of spatial organisation of airport
>lounches. The researcher placed himself at a certain distance from an
>innocent test person and then moved closer and closer until the test >person started to feel uncomfortable and give evidence of different kinds >of "escape behaviour". After that the researcher measured the distance >between the two persons and gave the test person en inquiry form to fill >in. Just now I can't find the full title of Dahlman's report but the >researcher himself can be found at the Dept of Consumer Research at the >University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
>Dick Urban Vestbro
>
>
>>Dear All,
>>Is anybody aware of any instruments developed to measure different >>types of territory or territoriality? Please let me know of any as we >>would rather use/adapt existing measures than reinvent the wheel.
>>Thanks
>>Dr Sandy Smith,
>>School of Social Science,
>>Queensland University of Technology,
>>PO Box 2434 Brisbane 4001 Australia
>>Phone: (07) 3864 4502

___________________________________
Date: Wed Mar 04 17:04:27 1998
Reply-To: envbeh-l@duke.poly.edu
Sender: owner-envbeh-l@duke.poly.edu
Precedence: bulk
From: sg.smith@qut.edu.au (Sandy Smith)
To: envbeh-l@duke.poly.edu
Subject: Re: Test instruments for territoriality
 

Denise,
thanks for the tip,
sandy

>Dr. Smith,
>
>Are you familiar with Edward Halls' Handbook for Proxemic Research ? Copious
>materials on procedure and interpretation of results are presented in this
>publication including various systems for analyzing proxemic data. Part Two
>has a fairly good description of utilizing a proxetic notation system; record
>keeping, coding, etc.
>
>Hall's Handbook was published by the Society for the Anthropology of Visual
>Communication, Washington, D. C. in 1974.
>
>Hope this info will be of assistance to you.
>
>Good Luck,
>
>Denise Homme
>University of California-Riverside
>Interior Design Program
>
>
>
>
>

Dr Sandy Smith,
School of Social Science,
Queensland University of Technology,
PO Box 2434 Brisbane 4001
Australia
Phone: (07) 3864 4502

_________________________________________________
From ???@??? Wed Mar 04 17:04:29 1998
Reply-To: envbeh-l@duke.poly.edu
Sender: owner-envbeh-l@duke.poly.edu
Precedence: bulk
From: "J.A.F. Teklenburg" <J.A.F.Teklenburg@BWK.TUE.NL>
To: envbeh-l@duke.poly.edu
Subject: Re: Test instruments for territoriality (A)
 

I received your e-mail. I am not in my office until 25 March. If you have urgent matters concerning practical matters for the IAPS 15 conference, please contact EIRASS at eirass@bwk.tue.nl
Urgent matters concerning the review process for the proceedings should be adressed to Joost van Andel at j.a.v.andel@tm.tue.nl
 

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 1998 00:36:20 EST
From: DHomme <DHomme@aol.com>
To: envbeh-l@duke.poly.edu
Subject: Re: Test instruments for territoriality
 

Dr. Smith,

Are you familiar with Edward Halls' Handbook for Proxemic Research ? Copious materials on procedure and interpretation of results are presented in this publication including various systems for analyzing proxemic data. Part Two has a fairly good description of utilizing a proxetic notation system; record keeping, coding, etc.

Hall's Handbook was published by the Society for the Anthropology of Visual Communication, Washington, D. C. in 1974.

Hope this info will be of assistance to you.

Good Luck,

Denise Homme
University of California-Riverside
Interior Design Program
 
 

------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 1998 23:07:22 +0100
From: negenter@worldcom.ch (Nold Egenter)
To: envbeh-l@duke.poly.edu
Subject: Re: Test instruments for territoriality
 

Sandy Smith and other interested in territoriality,

Exemplarically interesting! All these discussions about human
territoriality and behavior in space are handicapped by two things:
1) the projection of space as void on human condition (disparity of
anthropological space and space of physics, astronomy etc.)
2) that the humanities and their classification into post-scholastic
disciplines have outtrickstered the territorial categories of human
material culture (architecture, art, etc.) as well as of human ideas
(religion, philosophy, science etc.). What remains is a highly distilled
view that covers up the fact that man is still tremendously a "territorial
animal" (Robert Ardrey)
* Read ancient myths of creation, Babylonian for instance: its basically on
territorial demarcation.
* Read about ancient Religions: they are basically territorially
constitutive (including the Ancient Testament!)
* Have a look at maps of the Middle Ages: Cathedrals, churches and
monasteries are represented as 'pars pro toto' for certain territories, in
fact, as 'nuclear territorial demarcation'.

Thus, to "measure" territoriality in airport lounges is probably not the
right place to solve the problem!

To get out of this handicap, you should probably include literature on
territoriality in the animal world. Because research is much more objective
there. You will become aware about the complex importance of the
'territorial imperative' (Ardrey), also for man.
* Hediger, H. did several studies on territoriality of animals (e.g. ;
Evolution of territorial behavior, in: Washburn S. L. (ed.), The social
Life of Early Man 1961; Nest and home, Folia primatologica 28, 170-87)
* Ardrey, R.: The Territorial Imperative (1966). In spite of some
illegitimate 'biologisms' still the best on the topic.
* Bollnow, O. W.: Man and space (1963; see English review in our website)

Best wishes

Nold Egenter

Probably the best sources for 'human territoriality' and its spatial and
structural extensions are the recent cultural history books amply using
maps and culturo-historical atlasses!

_________________________

>Sandy Smith and others interested in territoriality,
>By territoriality you could mean the size of the "bubble" Edward T Hall is
>refering to when he talks about the "hidden dimension". I don't know what
>you mean exactly by "instruments", but a possible method is the one used by
>Sven Dahlman in his study (1973) of spatial organisation of airport
>lounches. The researcher placed himself at a certain distance from an
>innocent test person and then moved closer and closer until the test person
>started to feel uncomfortable and give evidence of different kinds of
>"escape behaviour". After that the researcher measured the distance between
>the two persons and gave the test person en inquiry form to fill in. Just
>now I can't find the full title of Dahlman's report but the researcher
>himself can be found at the Dept of Consumer Research at the University of
>Gothenburg, Sweden.
>Dick Urban Vestbro
>
>
>>Dear All,
>>Is anybody aware of any instruments developed to measure different types
>>of territory or territoriality? Please let me know of any as we would
>>rather use/adapt existing measures than reinvent the wheel.
>>Thanks
>>Dr Sandy Smith,
>>School of Social Science,
>>Queensland University of Technology,
>>PO Box 2434 Brisbane 4001 Australia
>>Phone: (07) 3864 4502

> > > > > > > > > > See our INTERNET-Homepage: http://home.worldcom.ch/~negenter

Nold Egenter
DOFSBT, Chorgasse 19
CH-8001 Zuerich, Switzerland
Tel.: +41-1-2516075
Fx: +41-21-3231707
----or:
e-mail: negenter@worldcom.ch
 



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